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Silver appointed to Gaming Commission 

Former judge Abbi Silver (Credit: Nevada Appellate Courts/Administrative Office of the Courts)

Dana Gentry, Nevada Current
April 18, 2024

Gov. Joe Lombardo announced Thursday he’s appointing retired Nevada Supreme Court Justice Abbi Silver to the Nevada Gaming Commission. Silver will replace Commissioner Ogonna Brown, whose term ends next week. 

“Justice Silver is one of Nevada’s brightest visionaries and trailblazers, and I’m confident that she will greatly enhance the work of the commission in her new role,” Lombardo said in a news release. 

Silver, who served four years on the state’s high court before retiring in 2022, will be the second retired judge on the commission. Commission chairwoman Jennifer Togliatti retired from the bench in 2019. 

A former prosecutor with the Clark County District Attorney, Silver was first elected to the Las Vegas Municipal Court in 2003, and later to Las Vegas Justice Court.  She was elected to the Clark County District Court in 2008 and re-elected in 2014. Silver was next elected as a district court judge in the Eighth Judicial District Court. She was appointed by Gov. Brian Sandoval to the Appeals Court, and elected in 2018 to the Supreme Court.   

“I’m honored to be appointed to the Nevada Gaming Commission,” Silver said in the statement issued by the governor’s office. “I’m grateful to Governor Lombardo for entrusting me with this dynamic role, and I look forward to serving our state.”

Nevada Current is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Nevada Current maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Hugh Jackson for questions: info@nevadacurrent.com. Follow Nevada Current on Facebook and Twitter.

This article is republished from Nevada Current under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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